29 August 2010

toki lipu toki

This is a project I'm very slowly working on. I doubt I'll ever complete it.

This is a translation of the Orthodox Canon.
If I complete that, I'll tackle a translation of The Ethiopiac Canon of Eighty One (Narrower Canon). If I complete that I'll tackle The Ethiopiac Canon of Eighty One (Broader Canon).

Each verse is accompanied by a map depicting the location of the place that the verse either refers to, or was written at.

Each verse is accompanied by either a drawing, or a diagram that depicts the subject of the verse.

A sentence diagram of each verse, for the Aramaic, Coptic, Greek, Hebrew, Latin, English, and toki pona sentence.

The footnotes for each verse contain:
* Morphological markup for the Aramaic, Coptic, Greek, Hebrew, and Latin;
* A concordance of each Aramaic, Coptic, Greek, Hebrew, Latin, English, and toki pona word in the verse;
* Cross-references to other verses that cover the same subject matter. These cross-references are based on data from Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge, Naves Topical Bible, and similar public domain, and creative commons licensed sources;
* An explanation of why each specific word/phrase in the translation was chosen;
* Significant textual variants in the Aramaic, Coptic, Greek, Hebrew, and Latin that aren't discussed above, and why they were/were not used.);
* Aramaic, Coptic, Greek, Hebrew, and Latin gematria values for each word, verse, chapter, and book;

To cast this as an e-Sword resource, one is looking at:

* A set of map resources for the sentence diagrams in Aramaic;
* A set of map resources for the sentence diagrams in Coptic;
* A set of map resources for the sentence diagrams in Greek;
* A set of map resources for the sentence diagrams in Hebrew;
* A set of map resources for the sentence diagrams in Latin;
* A set of map resources for the sentence diagrams in English;
* A set of map resources for the maps;
* A set of map resources for the images/diagrams;
Due to the size --- 45 000 images --- the set would consist of roughly 900 resources.

* A gematria dictionary;
* A Latin concordance cast as a dictionary;
* A Greek concordance cast as a dictionary;
* A Hebrew concordance cast as a dictionary;
* A Coptic concordance cast as a dictionary;
* An Aramaic concordance cast as a dictionary;
* An English concordance cast as a dictionary;
* A toki pona concordance cast as a dictionary;
* An Aramaic, Coptic, Greek, Hebrew, Latin, English, toki pona concordance cast as a commentary resource;
* An Aramaic, Coptic, Greek, Hebrew, Latin lexicon cast as a commentary resource;
* An Aramaic, Coptic, Greek, Hebrew, Latin lexicon cast as a dictionary resource;
* An Aramaic, Coptic, Greek, Hebrew, Latin critical apparatus cast as a commentary resource;
* The TSK, Naves etc based cross references cast as a commentary resource;
* The TSK, Naves etc based cross references cast as a dictionary resource;
* The explanation of why each phrase was chosen, cast as a commentary resource;


I initially started the translation using BibleStudy2006. I used this program for about a month, before giving up on it. The fundamental idea was good. The problem was the implementation.

BibleStudy2009, obtainable from http://bs2009.net/ had a plethora of improvements, that make it much easier for people to do Bible translations. The only flaw is that it requires .Net 3.0, which is only available for Windows.

[Disclaimer: I was a BibleStudy2009 beta tester. I did experience a bug, which Frank did fix.]

Since I no longer use Windows, I'm writing my own tool chain to help with the translations, sentence diagramming, and concordance creation.

As I complete each phase of this project, I will be releasing the associated e-Sword resource.
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